How to Achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress: 2 Aspects to Keep in Mind Each Term

Graduation requires a 2.0 and sixty-seven percent completion rate.

Graduation requires a 2.0 and sixty-seven percent completion rate.

SAP stands for Satisfactory Academic Progress, and is part of the checks and balances system that keeps both students and schools accountable for the amount of classes being taken, completed, and passed. Satisfactory Academic Progress often gets confused as only a financial aid issue. Because a student must maintain a positive percentage and grade point average (GPA) to be eligible to be awarded financial aid, but what many students do not understand is that without meeting or exceeding these standards, he or she will not graduate, even if all of the courses have been completed.

"D" don't get degrees!

"D" don't get degrees! If you need help, seek it in The Learning Curve.

The old adage “D’s get degrees.” is gone. Earning the occasional (one or two) failing or below average grade is not the concern, but students who routinely earn “C”  and maintain a GPA just above 2.0 have no wiggle room if they have a bad quarter and earn a below average grade. Dean of Students Aimee Miritello at Globe University’s La Crosse Campus said, “The biggest problem I see students run into regarding SAP is that they don’t continuously think of the importance it holds.  I see many students who make SAP each quarter, but are dangerously close to falling below the requirements.  In this situation, one bad quarter could put them below the line, and at that point it might be too late.  It is so important to not just try to make a 2.0 and 67%, but to strive to exceed these requirements.  This is done by getting A’s and B’s and not dropping classes.  In the end, W’s are just as detrimental as an F.”

As mentioned by Ms. Miritello, the requirements are a 2.0 GPA and a 67% completion rate. Failing a class goes against one’s completion rate as does dropping a class after the add/drop period designated by the school (generally the first week of classes each term). By not maintaining SAP, students can get themselves into a situation where they owe a great amount of money but have not gained the credentials they sought. Therefore, getting themselves into a worse situation than before they began.

Graduates. Yellow cords indicate graduating with high honors, 4.0!

Graduates. Yellow cords indicate graduating with high honors, 4.0!

There are many things that can be done to avoid this situation. One is seeking help where it is available. On Globe’s La Crosse’s campus one of the first places a student should start is in The Learning Curve. The Learning Curve is a place where both residential and online students can come to get tutoring in their classes. The tutoring is free to the students as long as he or she is attending class and continues to make appointments scheduled with the private tutor. The Learning Curve also offers walk-in tutoring in which students can just come in and ask for help in the area he or she is struggling. From ten in the morning to around five in the evening Monday through Thursday there are faculty and student tutors available to answer the questions of confused or struggling students.

So…what do I do to become SAP met if I have gotten myself into a bad academic situation? First and foremost: ask for help. No one is able to aid you until you identify that you want help and you know what sort of help you may need. Once you know what sort of help you need, it is much easier for you to ask for it, and much easier for us to get you the assistance you require. Know that there is a whole education team available on your campus to aid you in getting SAP met. You just need to know who to ask and where to look.

Students-at-Globe-Graduation

Students-at-Globe-Graduation