Small Classes and Teachers Who Care: Words from a Globe Student

A father, veteran, and life-long learner, Bob Matthews is not only dedicated to pursing a criminal justice degree, he’s serious about his career. Learn how small classes and caring teachers helped him decide Globe University-La Crosse was the university for him.

Small Classes Make a Difference

Bob Matthews with his son Hunter. Bob graduated with his associate degree in criminal justice from Globe University-La Crosse. He's currently completing his bachelor degree.

Bob Matthews with his son Hunter. Bob graduated with his associate degree in criminal justice from Globe University-La Crosse. He's currently completing his bachelor degree.

Classes at Globe University are small, student focused, and geared to the adult learner. No class is over 24 students, and many, including general education classes, are much smaller.

“At my age, it was…nice to see that the classes… were small in size, had a higher median age, utilize teachers who have all been out into the real world and have practiced what they preach,” Bob explained.

In addition to small classes, Globe University instructors have career experience they bring to the classroom. They use this experience to engage students with personal stories, hands-on activities, and guest speakers.

Individual Support

At Globe, there is always someone to help. Students receive individualized support for financial aid, career services, education, and more.

“Not being seen as a number, but as a participant in the education process, makes the school and its members actual partners in a student’s education,” Bob said. Faculty and staff work to ensure each student is supported during and after graduation.

Teachers Who Care

Globe faculty and staff genuinely want students to succeed. Bob witnessed this in his first quarter at Globe.

“Our Global Citizenship class had just wrapped up its final public outreach project,” Bob shared. “It went off well and everyone benefited greatly. Still to this day I laugh about what happened next–only because that is my response to any and all powerful emotional events. Our teacher, Carolyn Moe, started crying. The tears were a mixture of pride in a job well done and the fact that she was losing us as students. She cared.